Wednesday , September 19 2018
  • English
  • Spanish
Home / All / Exhibition of Mexican Photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo Sheds Light on the Pioneering Photojournalist

Exhibition of Mexican Photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo Sheds Light on the Pioneering Photojournalist


 

 

Exhibition of Mexican Photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo Sheds Light on the Pioneering Photojournalist Lola Álvarez Bravo:

Picturing Mexico highlights the photographer’s critical role in the country’s modernist wave

On view September 14, 2018 – February 16, 2019

 

PRESS PREVIEW: Friday, September 14, 2018; 10am

LOUIS, MO, JUL 11, 2018— The Pulitzer Arts Foundation explores the career of pioneering Mexican photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo (1903 – 1993) with an exhibition of images that she considered to be her personal photography. Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico presents nearly 50 photographs and photomontages spanning Álvarez Bravo’s five-decade career. Together, these illuminate the ways in which her modernist aesthetic, with meticulous attention to pattern, light, and composition, contributed to her depictions of Mexico’s diverse inhabitants and landscapes as she traveled the country documenting life in the years following the Mexican Revolution (ca. 1910– 1920).

On view from September 14, 2018, through February 16, 2019, Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico has been curated by Pulitzer Arts Foundation Assistant Curator Stephanie Weissberg. The Pulitzer is the exhibition’s only venue.

Pulitzer Director Cara Starke says, “Our fall exhibitions, one devoted to Lola Álvarez Bravo and a simultaneous presentation of the work of Ruth Asawa, highlight women who have been under recognized. In the case of Lola Álvarez Bravo, we see a brilliant artist and activist who was for many years eclipsed by her better-known husband, photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo. Yet she

Page1 Lola Álvarez Bravo, Untitled , 1954. Gelatin inches (23.7 x 19.5 cm). Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.70. © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

made extraordinary, profound photographs, assembling a body of work that played a crucial role in both the country’s cultural renaissance in the years following the Mexican Revolution and in the flourishing of modernism there.”

Weissberg adds, “Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico aims to represent the arc of Álvarez Bravo’s career, illuminating her considerable impact on the history of photography and—as a self-directed agent of change—on post-Revolutionary Mexico. In doing this, we hope to provide and provoke new insights into her work, including the ways in which her astutely perceptive portraits of the life and landscape of Mexico were at once documentation and modernist experimentation.”

Background  Born in 1903 in Jalisco, Mexico, Lola Álvarez Bravo began taking photographs in 1925, when she moved from Mexico City to Oaxaca with her husband, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, who would become one of the most prominent photographers of the period. In 1927, the couple moved to Mexico City, where Lola Álvarez Bravo would work as a curator, an educator, and a gallerist, coming into contact with many of the most prominent figures in Mexico’s modernist avant-garde, from painters David Alfaro Siqueiros, Frida Kahlo, and Diego Rivera, to photographers Tina Modotti, Paul Strand, and Henri Cartier-Bresson, as well as numerous writers and intellectuals.

Shortly after the Álvarez Bravos separated in 1934, Lola began a professional practice as a photojournalist. As a female photographer, she occupied a rare and often stigmatized position, and she once described herself as “the only woman that ran around the streets with a camera, at sports events and the Independence Day parades, and all the reporters made fun of me.”

Exhibition Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico comprises work that Álvarez Bravo considered her “personal” photography, what she described as “images that affected me deeply, like electricity, and made me press the camera shutter.” Highlighting several intersecting themes that informed the photographer’s practice, the exhibition focuses on both her subjects and the impact of modernism on the way she portrayed them.

 

The presentation begins with a group of portraits of friends, collaborators, and professional contacts—the images for which Álvarez Bravo is best-known outside of Mexico. Included here is a portrait of Frida Kahlo seated on the bed in her home studio, and one of Henri Cartier-Bresson photographing an as-yet unfinished mural by David Alfaro Siqueros. Other images remove the sitter from the evidence of their daily lives and professions. Artist Isabel Villaseñor, for example, is shown standing in front of a rock formation that occupies the entire background. A raking shadow covers her arm, seeming to merge it with the background and creating an interplay between light and dark, and between landscape and the human figure.

Lola Álvarez Bravo, Unos suben y otros bajan, ca. 1940. Gelatin silver print. 9 ¼ x 6 inches (23.5 x 17.6 cm). Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.97. © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

Picturing Mexico continues with images of labor, a recurring theme for Álvarez Bravo, as it was for many during the post-revolutionary years. One of the images here, Las Lavanderas, or Washerwomen, dating from around 1940, shows a group of women on the shore of a body of water, photographed from above as they focus on their work. The shadows that stretch across the sand are clearly those of a human-made structure, perhaps a pier on which the artist is perched. Landscape and architecture thus converge in the waterfront scene where, again, we also see a play of light and dark. Caught mid-motion, the women and children add a note of humanity and a kind of poetry to the scene, as they form a counterpoint to the rectilinearity of the cast shadow. Moreover, their faces are obscured, so that it takes a moment to understand what they are doing in the space of this complex composition. This uncertainty distinguishes Álvarez Bravo’s work from the highly ordered and legible depictions ty

Lola Álvarez Bravo, Sexo vegetal, ca. 1948. Gelatin silver print 7 ⅜ x 9 ⅛ inches (18.8 x 23.1 cm). Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.69 © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

pical of most of the contemporaneous art produced in the service of nation-building.

 

The next group of works shows Álvarez Bravo addressing the rapid changes in the architecture and landscape of post-Revolutionary Mexico, not only with images of modern buildings, such as architect Felix Candela’s Church of our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, a modernist icon located in Mexico City, but also with photographs of traditional structures and building methods. In Bajareque, of ca. 1938, Álvarez Bravo depicts an example of the eponymous construction method, which dates to the pre-Hispanic period, in keeping with the post-Revolutionary focus of art that addresses Mexico’s working class and indigenous communities. Yet she comes in so close that the frame is filled edge-to-edge with tightly bound layers of twine, on the left, and earth, on the right. In doing so she at once highlights the technique’s intricate handwork and creates an abstract composition.

Álvarez Bravo’s engagement with modernism is addressed directly in a group of four images. In one of these, Sexo Vegetal (Plant Sex), of ca. 1948, she points her lens directly into the center of a tightly cropped maguey plant, a species of agave, recalling the images of Edward Weston and Tina Modotti in which calla lilies, peppers, shells, and gourds are transformed into sensual forms resembling the corporeal. Those earlier evocations of the body are manifest in Sexo Vegetal, where fleshy splayed leaves open around a central flowering spear, standing in for male and female sex organs. Yet this work contains evidence that Álvarez Bravo chafed against the modernist opposition to photographic alteration, as she transformed the image by rotating it 90 degrees from its original orientation. In doing this, she creates a pattern of shadow that appears to emanate, impossibly, from a source below the plant, endowing the image with a sense of the uncanny that conjures Surrealism.

Lola Álvarez Bravo, La Visitación, ca. 1934, printed 1971. Gelatin silver photograph. 9 ¼ x 6 ¾ inches (23.5 x 17.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, purchased with funds given by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Adrian Gill and Coler Foundation, 1995.125. © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

Álvarez Bravo was one of Mexico’s first artists to produce photomontage, shown in the following section. Most of these were more explicitly political than her photography, addressing the changing architectural environment as well as conditions of labor, industrialization, and technology. In Hilados del Norte II (Northern Yarns II), of ca. 1948, one of two photomontages on view, she blends images of automobile manufacturing with the urban landscape. Unlike the celebrated photomontages of the Dada movement, Álvarez Bravo used her own photographs rather than found images in this body of work, and she arranged them to create the illusion of depth, rather than embracing the inherent flatness of the medium.

Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico concludes with a group of six images that evoke photography’s unique relationship to the acts of seeing and being seen. In these, the photographer, who once referred to the camera as a “third eye,” uses doors, windows, and other portals as framing devices. In some images, such as the 1950 Saliendo de la Opera (Leaving the Opera), depicting three men hauling a prop horse as they exit Mexico City’s Palacio de Bellas Artes, she captured her subjects in moments of transition. At other times, her camera catches a subject’s direct gaze, as seen in Los gorrones (The Scroungers), of around 1955, an image of young boys idling on a staircase in which some of them look at the photographer while the others seem unaware of her presence, absorbed by their own act of looking.

Catalogue Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, published by Yale University Press, with essays by Ms. Weissberg and Karen Cordero Reiman, art historian, curator, and Professor Emerita at the Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City.

About the

Pulitzer Arts Foundation

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation presents historic and contemporary art in dynamic interplay with its celebrated Tadao Ando building, offering unexpected experiences and inspiring new perspectives. Since it was established in 2001, the Pulitzer has presented a wide range of exhibitions featuring art from around the world—from Old Masters to important modern and contemporary artists—and exploring a diverse array of themes and ideas. Highlights have included the exhibitions Blue Black, curated by artist Glenn Ligon (2017); Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form (2016-17); raumlaborberlin: 4562 Enright Avenue (2016); Reflections of the Buddha (2011-12); Urban Alchemy / Gordon Matta-Clark (2009-10); and Brancusi and Serra in Dialogue (2005). In addition, these exhibitions are complemented by programs that bring together leading figures from fields ranging from art, architecture, design, urban planning, and the humanities to social work. Admission to the museum is free.

Located in the Grand Center Arts District of St. Louis, Missouri, the Pulitzer is free and open to the public between 10am–5pm on Wednesday through Saturday, with evening hours until 8pm on Friday.

 


 

Exposición de la fotógrafa mexicana Lola Álvarez Bravo arroja luz sobre la fotoperiodista pionera Lola Álvarez Bravo:
La imagen de México destaca el papel crítico del fotógrafo en la onda modernista del país
A la vista 14 de septiembre de 2018 – 16 de febrero de 2019

PRENSA PREVIA: viernes, 14 de septiembre de 2018; 10am

LOUIS, MO, 11 DE JULIO DE 2018- La Fundación de Artes Pulitzer explora la carrera de la fotógrafa mexicana pionera Lola Álvarez Bravo (1903 – 1993) con una exhibición de imágenes que ella consideraba su fotografía personal. Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico presenta cerca de 50 fotografías y fotomontajes que abarcan la carrera de cinco décadas de Álvarez Bravo. Juntos, estos iluminan las formas en que su estética modernista, con atención meticulosa a los patrones, la luz y la composición, contribuyó a sus representaciones de los diversos habitantes y paisajes de México mientras viajaba por el país documentando la vida en los años posteriores a la Revolución Mexicana (ca. 1910 – 1920).

Page1 Lola Álvarez Bravo, Untitled , 1954. Gelatin inches (23.7 x 19.5 cm). Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.70. © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

Desde el 14 de septiembre de 2018 hasta el 16 de febrero de 2019, Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico ha sido comisariada por la curadora adjunta de Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Stephanie Weissberg. El Pulitzer es el único lugar de la exposición.

La directora de Pulitzer, Cara Starke, dice: “Nuestras exhibiciones de otoño, una dedicada a Lola Álvarez Bravo y una presentación simultánea del trabajo de Ruth Asawa, resaltan a las mujeres que no han sido reconocidas. En el caso de Lola Álvarez Bravo, vemos a una brillante artista y activista que durante muchos años fue eclipsada por su esposo, el fotógrafo Manuel Álvarez Bravo, más conocido. Sin embargo ella hizo fotografías extraordinarias y profundas, reuniendo un cuerpo de trabajo que jugó un papel crucial tanto en el renacimiento cultural del país en los años posteriores a la Revolución Mexicana como en el florecimiento del modernismo allí “.

Weissberg agrega: “Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico pretende representar el arco de la carrera de Álvarez Bravo, iluminando su considerable impacto en la historia de la fotografía y -como agente de cambio autodirigido- en el México posrevolucionario. Al hacer esto, esperamos proporcionar y provocar nuevos conocimientos sobre su trabajo, incluidas las formas en que sus astutos retratos perceptivos de la vida y el paisaje de México fueron a la vez documentación y experimentación modernista “.

Antecedentes Nacida en 1903 en Jalisco, México, Lola Álvarez Bravo comenzó a tomar fotografías en 1925, cuando se mudó de la ciudad de México a Oaxaca con su esposo, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, quien se convertiría en uno de los fotógrafos más destacados de la época. En 1927, la pareja se mudó a la Ciudad de México, donde Lola Álvarez Bravo trabajaría como curadora, educadora y galerista, y entraría en contacto con muchas de las figuras más destacadas de la vanguardia modernista de México, de los pintores David Alfaro Siqueiros, Frida Kahlo y Diego Rivera, a los fotógrafos Tina Modotti, Paul Strand y Henri Cartier-Bresson, así como a numerosos escritores e intelectuales.

Lola Álvarez Bravo, Unos suben y otros bajan, ca. 1940. Gelatin silver print. 9 ¼ x 6 inches (23.5 x 17.6 cm). Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.97. © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

Poco después de que los Álvarez Bravos se separaron en 1934, Lola comenzó una práctica profesional como fotoperiodista. Como fotógrafa, ocupó una posición rara ya menudo estigmatizada, y una vez se describió a sí misma como “la única mujer que corría por las calles con una cámara, en eventos deportivos y en los desfiles del Día de la Independencia, y todos los periodistas se burlaban de mí ”

Exposición Lola Álvarez Bravo: La imagen de México comprende trabajos que Álvarez Bravo consideró su fotografía “personal”, lo que describió como “imágenes que me afectaron profundamente, como la electricidad, y me hicieron apretar el obturador de la cámara”. Destacando varios temas intersectados que informaron al fotógrafo práctica, la exposición se centra tanto en sus sujetos como en el impacto del modernismo en la forma en que los retrató.

La presentación comienza con un grupo de retratos de amigos, colaboradores y contactos profesionales, las imágenes por las cuales Álvarez Bravo es más conocido fuera de México. Aquí se incluye un retrato de Frida Kahlo sentada en la cama del estudio de su casa, y una de Henri Cartier-Bresson fotografiando un mural aún no terminado de David Alfaro Siqueros. Otras imágenes eliminan a la modelo de la evidencia de su vida cotidiana y sus profesiones. La artista Isabel Villaseñor, por ejemplo, se muestra de pie frente a una formación rocosa que ocupa todo el fondo. Una sombra rasante cubre su brazo, parece fusionarlo con el fondo y crear una interacción entre la luz y la oscuridad, y entre el paisaje y la figura humana.

Lola Álvarez Bravo, Sexo vegetal, ca. 1948. Gelatin silver print 7 ⅜ x 9 ⅛ inches (18.8 x 23.1 cm). Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Lola Álvarez Bravo Archive 93.6.69 © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

La imagen de México continúa con imágenes de trabajo, un tema recurrente para Álvarez Bravo, como lo fue para muchos durante los años posrevolucionarios. Una de las imágenes aquí, Las Lavanderas o lavandera, que data de alrededor de 1940, muestra a un grupo de mujeres en la orilla de un cuerpo de agua, fotografiadas desde arriba mientras se concentran en su trabajo. Las sombras que se extienden a través de la arena son claramente las de una estructura hecha por el hombre, tal vez un muelle en el que el artista está posado. El paisaje y la arquitectura convergen así en la escena costera donde, de nuevo, también vemos un juego de luces y sombras. Atrapados en medio del movimiento, las mujeres y los niños agregan una nota de humanidad y una especie de poesía a la escena, ya que forman un contrapunto a la rectilinealidad de la sombra del elenco. Además, sus caras están oscurecidas, por lo que lleva un momento entender lo que están haciendo en el espacio de esta compleja composición. Esta incertidumbre distingue el trabajo de Álvarez Bravo de las representaciones altamente ordenadas y legibles

Álvarez Bravo fue uno de los primeros artistas de México en producir fotomontaje, que se muestra en la siguiente sección. La mayoría de estos fueron más explícitamente políticos que su fotografía, abordando el entorno arquitectónico cambiante, así como las condiciones de trabajo, industrialización y tecnología. En Hilados del Norte II (Northern Yarns II), de ca. 1948, uno de los dos fotomontajes a la vista, mezcla imágenes de la fabricación de automóviles con el paisaje urbano. A diferencia de los celebrados fotomontajes del movimiento Dada, Álvarez Bravo usó sus propias fotografías en lugar de imágenes encontradas en este cuerpo de trabajo, y las dispuso para crear la ilusión de profundidad, en lugar de abrazar la llanura inherente del medio.

Lola Álvarez Bravo, La Visitación, ca. 1934, printed 1971. Gelatin silver photograph. 9 ¼ x 6 ¾ inches (23.5 x 17.2 cm). Brooklyn Museum, purchased with funds given by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Adrian Gill and Coler Foundation, 1995.125. © 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico concluye con un grupo de seis imágenes que evocan la relación única de la fotografía con los actos de ver y ser visto. En estos, el fotógrafo, que alguna vez se refirió a la cámara como un “tercer ojo”, usa puertas, ventanas y otros portales como dispositivos de encuadre. En algunas imágenes, como la Saliendo de la Ópera de 1950, que representa a tres hombres que arrastran un caballo de hélice al salir del Palacio de Bellas Artes de la Ciudad de México, capturó a sus súbditos en momentos de transición. En otras ocasiones, su cámara capta la mirada directa de un sujeto, como se ve en Los gorrones, de alrededor de 1955, una imagen de niños vagando por una escalera en la que algunos miran al fotógrafo mientras que los otros parecen ignorarlo. su presencia, absorbida por su propio acto de mirar.

Catálogo Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico estará acompañado por un catálogo completamente ilustrado, publicado por Yale University Press, con ensayos de Weissberg y Karen Cordero Reiman, historiadora del arte, comisaria y profesora emérita de la Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México.

Acerca de la Fundación de Artes Pulitzer

Pulitzer Arts Foundation

La Pulitzer Arts Foundation presenta arte histórico y contemporáneo en interacción dinámica con su famoso edificio Tadao Ando, ​​que ofrece experiencias inesperadas e inspira nuevas perspectivas. Desde su creación en 2001, el Pulitzer ha presentado una amplia gama de exposiciones con obras de arte de todo el mundo, desde antiguos maestros hasta importantes artistas modernos y contemporáneos, y explora una gran variedad de temas e ideas. Los puntos destacados han incluido las exposiciones Blue Black, comisariada por el artista Glenn Ligon (2017); Medardo Rosso: Experimentos en luz y forma (2016-17); raumlaborberlin: 4562 Enright Avenue (2016); Reflexiones de Buda (2011-12); Urban Alchemy / Gordon Matta-Clark (2009-10); y Brancusi y Serra en Diálogo (2005). Además, estas exposiciones se complementan con programas que reúnen a figuras destacadas de campos que van desde el arte, la arquitectura, el diseño, la planificación urbana y las humanidades hasta el trabajo social. La entrada al museo es gratis.

Ubicado en el Grand Centre Arts District de St. Louis, Missouri, el Pulitzer es gratuito y está abierto al público de 10:00 a.m. a 5:00 p.m. de miércoles a sábado, y hasta las 8 p.m. los viernes.


About Red Latina

Check Also

Schnucks acquires 19 Shop ’n Save stores in St. Louis region

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Translate »